3 Mistakes To Avoid In Industrial Mixing

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Solving Mixing Problems

There are few things more frustrating in life than setting out to accomplish an objective and running into a problem. If you look up roadblocks, it will not be found under the heading “fun”. If your desired objective involves the art and science of industrial mixing then you’ve reached a new height of difficulties. One thing is clear when it comes to problems in industrial mixing, when a roadblock comes into effect, a product is prevented from being produced. In fact, because industrial mixing is involved in such a vast array of industries, each application comes with an entirely different set of unique problems to overcome. Problems arise. We understand that. This has led us to a taking a posture of service by helping others to understand their mixing problems. In this resource, we want to help you avoid 3 mistakes to avoid in industrial mixing.

General Problems To Address In Mixing

Problems can take on a variety of forms when it comes to industrial mixing. Some general mixing problems might include, but are not limited to: design, incorrect texture or state of a product, lack of desired output of a product, or less than desirable quality. This often leads to frustration and failure to meet production quotas which in turn may increase costs. Other obstacles in mixing may include: over-mixing, costly redesign, and more. In the Handbook of Industrial Mixing, the author points to a resolve to many of these questions by suggesting that one simply ask “Why” and “How” when attempting to achieve a solution to your mixing problem. Defining your problem is the best way to begin the process of finding a solution the problem in your process.

3 Mistakes To Avoid In Industrial Mixing

1. Lowering Your Impeller To The Bottom Of Your Tank Does Not Create Better Flow

Problem:

One major obstacle found in mixing is getting your product to flow correctly. Meaning, you want your product to be properly mixed all the way throughout your vessel or tank. However, there is a common mistake that many make when trying to overcome this problem. It would appear that moving your existing mixing blade closer and closer to the bottom of your tank would fix your problem, but in actuality it makes things worse. One of the most common mixing blades (also one of the most popularly purchased Mixer Direct impellers) you will find on an industrial mixer is an axial flow impeller.
Lowering an axial impeller to the bottom of a tank will actually negate your thrust off your blade and limit your flow to the very bottom. This causes the flow to be worse than before.

Answer:

The holistic solution to this problem is best solved by assessing your current mixer and confirming that the mixer currently in use is properly sized for your process. This solution should factor in your mixing tank or vessel size, blade to tank ratio, horsepower, bulk flow to velocity, and the RPMs of the shaft. At Mixer Direct, we are committed to giving our customers accessible expertise to overcome this problem. Contact our expert sales engineers to assess your current mixing process and discover solutions.

2. Bigger Is Not Necessarily Better When It Comes To Impellers

Problem:

A larger mixing blade does not necessarily ensure success in your process. The problem is that a bigger blade will draw more horsepower and can often result in burning or over heating up your motor (this can also cause the motor to smoke as well). This can also destroy components on your mixer. Such as a gearbox, wires will short and fuse together,

Answer:

A fast solution does not equal a bigger blade. When it comes to purchasing a new impeller or replacing your current one, horsepower and blade width must be taken into account. Taking the time to identify the problem and develop a successful mixer configuration is the best solution to this problem. Major factors to consider include horsepower, a gearbox, impeller size, product viscosity, and tank size. It is also possible to use existing pieces to incorporate into a better mixing configuration can also help to ensure a more successful process. Don't try to rush for ineffective quick fix, call one of our expert sales engineers and let us help develop a solution to your problem.

3. More Horsepower Does Not = Success

Problem:

Unfortunately, purchasing an industrial mixer is not the same as shopping for a sports car. More horsepower doesn't necessarily ensure that your process will be successful. In fact, throwing more horsepower at a problem in your industrial mixing process can create bigger problems.

Answer:

There are a few factors that should be taken to account when considering the amount of horsepower required for your process. This includes the necessary amount of torque, the viscosity of the substance you’re mixing, and the desired end resulting product. Depending on your application, the draw from your mixing blade may not require nearly as much horsepower as one might think. At Mixer Direct, we want to humbly serve our customers. If your process only requires 1 horsepower we are not going to sell you a 5 horsepower motor. We encourage you to take the time to share about your process with our expert sales engineers and let them do the calculations to determine what is the best ratio of horsepower and speed for your process.

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